Thousands of elders are living in nursing homes despite lack of need, many against their will.   Many elderly patients get admitted to the hospital with profound weakness due to their acute and chronic medical conditions and they will leave the hospital with profound weakness from their acute and chronic medical conditions. In most situations, these patients will be too weak to take care of themselves.  They will need extra help with their activities of daily living either from family or from trained home health care representatives. Patients who cannot safely return to the community often need to transition through a nursing home (with skilled nurses) before returning home. Hundreds of thousands of older adults and younger people with disabilities are living in nursing homes only because that is where Medicaid drives them. They have no clinical need for skilled nursing care, and, if better elder care options were available, many could be living in other settings, including their own homes. For most elderly folks, giving up their independence and being forced into a nursing home is their biggest fear.  Nobody can ever force you to go anywhere you don't want to go, as long as you have the capacity to make your own medical decision.  Your doctor can't force you,  your nurse can't force you, even your powers of attorney can't force you.  If your family is telling you that you have to go to a nursing home or skilled nursing facility and you don't want to and you have the capacity to make that decision, no matter how poor that decision is, you have the right to go home against everyone's wishes. Related Posts They May Be Out Of The Closet, But Many LGBT Seniors Are Facing Aging Alone. Bulletin: 20,000 Elders to Lose Their Home Care Under Medicaid And Be Forced to Stay in Nursing Homes Lessons From The Front: What Nursing Homes Should Learn From Covid-19 Medicaid Medicaid—the joint state/federal health care program for the very poor—sends frail older adults to nursing homes even though they often are the most expensive and least appropriate option. And, as COVID-19 has taught us, they can be a high-risk setting for many. The Kaiser Family Foundation reports that as of Aug. 20, more than 70,000 residents and staff of long-term care facilities (including nursing homes and some assisted living facilities) have died from the pandemic. This is a complicated story, so let’s unpack it by first describing Medicaid long-term supports and services (LTSS) and then looking at nursing homes. States must provide people who have few financial assets, very low incomes, and high levels of personal care needs with long-term care. But Medicaid is required to provide care only in nursing facilities. States can apply for one of many special waivers that allow for care in the community. And every state has at least one. Indeed, more than half of Medicaid LTSS dollars are spent on care in settings other than nursing homes. But the level, quality, and definition of that care vary widely among the states. Many states provide only a few hours...

Discrimination against elders is on full display during this pandemic. Some people blame them for the shelter-in-place guidelines. Some say they should be offered up as a sacrifice for the good of the country. ...

My Elder Monitoring ensures that the needs of the elders are prioritized and fulfilled whether by using third party providers or by an advocate. This is especially helpful now that the elderly population is greatly affected by the coronavirus pandemic....

  From cohousing to multigenerational living, there are plenty of alternative eldercare solutions available these days.   These days, a person looking for senior housing – whether for independent living, assisted living, adult care home, or a long-term nursing facility – has more eldercare options than ever before, and there’s no reason to think that the growth will stop any time soon. Simply put, the senior population is exploding. After all, the Baby Boomer generation got its name for a reason. It’s also true that improved healthcare and a better understanding of diet and exercise are contributing to the nation's longevity. Many of today’s best available senior-housing options are really a nod to the past: higher-density locales, homes suited for multiple generations, and community support and stimulation that keeps retirees active and healthy. Until recently, U.S. senior-housing solutions have largely consisted of cookie-cutter developments demanding big upfront deposits from residents who might eventually face a new round of stress in seeking high-level, and usually expensive, nursing-home care elsewhere. The current and coming generation of older adults realizes that they can make other choices about where and how to live. With intention and planning, people around the nation are creating ways to live in community, alternatives that give them more control, more companionship, more dignity, and choice than generations past, and better long term care plans for their elder loved ones. It is already proving impossible for the eldercare housing industry to construct (or convert) enough brick and mortar structures into senior housing. That's not to mention the practical problems in finding and training sufficient staff. Today’s seniors are also becoming more of an economic force than ever before. This makes them of special interest to anyone involved in any branch of the eldercare industry, especially housing. As numerous studies have shown, retirees contribute significantly more to a given community than they take away. Not only do they spend money, but they may also do volunteer work, making them attractive tenants.   Related Posts Aging In Place Can Be A Godsend Getting Older Is Positive, Not Negative. Elder Orphans Need Not Face Old Age Alone   Few seniors have ever been thrilled at the idea of moving into anything that could be described as a “facility.” To live in the home of one’s own choosing has generally been seen as the ideal. Now that retirees have the sheer numbers and the money, they have gained leverage and are beginning to wield it. And if they need help deciding the best elder care option for them, the eldercare solutions experts of My Elder are here to help them. The world of alternative eldercare solutions to living a great life has never been riper than it is now. We at My Elder are forming partnerships with innovators in this space; we are here to help families find the best elder care options for their loved ones, including long term planning, assisted living placement, and nursing home placement, among others. We are exploring opportunities in forward-thinking countries who are faced with American and European ExPats looking for a fresher view on continuing...